We have repeatedly recommended the document “Law Enforcement Use of Tactical Emergency Casualty Care” by Tampa TacMed as a vital reference on “tactical” medical intervention in the real world.
The work compiles every LEO use of TCCC/TECC interventions that could be found, since 2004, into an easy read, complete with infographics. It is well worth your time to download and check it out. In reading it, one of the things that jumps out at us as we read, and look at the numbers, is the incidences of “Drags and Carries”. This is a subject that is sometimes little touched on, and little prepared for by non-medics, but the numbers make a strong argument to change this. In LEO TECC/TCCC incidents since 2004, drags or carries have been employed 58 times. Compare this to 62 uses of hemostatic agents, 37 uses of chest seals, and only 1 use of a nasopharyngeal airway (NPA). The need is clearly there for guys and gals to be up to speed on their drags and carries. We’re going to talk about gear here, but the very first thing is to get the skills, and regularly work the skills. Not fit enough to move another human being? Work on changing that. Don’t know how to move another human being? Classes covering the ways and means are out there. Plus, the information is readily available, and a patient friend can probably help you out if no formal training opportunities are readily available (just, use caution and work carefully. If you get hurt, it’s your own fault).
Let’s ask this question: How many of us have chest seals and NPA’s in our kits, but no casualty drag equipment? We’re wagering it’s more than a few. There are plenty of commercially available drags out there. Many of them are somewhat bulky, requiring a dedicated pouch, but also offering quite a bit of length and various attachment and routing options. And no matter the size, most of the dedicated “tactical” casualty drag set-ups are expensive. Between size and expense, drags are often relegated to carry only by medical responders, packed in larger kits, and not often considered “individual equipment”. One proposed solution to this is to carry several feet of 1” “climbing” (or tubular flat) webbing in a cargo pocket, or small pouch. How much, exactly, varies depending on who is making the suggestion: Just enough to get under someones arms, all the way up to 20-feet (an approx. 7” roll). Whatever length you find works, both for carriability and being long enough to actually use, a strap of 1” webbing is not a bad idea. The only problem with it we’ve run into is that unless it’s carefully stored and carefully deployed, the two free ends can be hard to keep track of (and sometimes, hard to hang onto if one’s hands slip any). Here’s an alternative setup that we’ve been playing with for awhile: 

W/ 6″ ruler, G17 mag, standard ID/CC size card, chapstick for size reference.
 

Climbing slings are a sewn loop of flat webbing, available in different lengths. And, in truth, the majority of climbing slings are far too short to be useful as a casualty drag. But, 6′ and 8′ loop-length slings can be found if someone looks. And most of them are cheap. The one pictured, a 72” Advanced Base Camp (ABC) sewn-sling, costs around $8 on Amazon where we got ours. To make the sling more versatile, we’ve paired them with a “quickdraw”, or two carabiners connected by a short dogbone of webbing sewn to hold the ‘biners at opposite ends. You can use two loose ‘biners, but we went with a quickdraw because it helps to retain the ‘biners in the wrapped up package, and adds some versatility in how they can be used. Quickdraws are available ready made, such as this $13 MadRock unit, or you can buy ‘draw connectors to use ‘biners you already have. Connecting two ‘biners yourself allows you to scale down a little more, like we did by using the smallest (3.7” long) ‘biners Mad Rock makes.

Although this set-up will lack some of the options of a longer strap of flat-webbing, or the purpose made casualty drags, it still offers a multitude of options for use. The greatest advantage here is the size of this setup once complete. Folded up, and secured with a rubber band or a silicone bracelet, this can be stuck in many pockets (to include jeans pockets), and certainly in a multitude of small pouches. Cost is also a significant advantage, coming in around $20 for the whole rig. You could also spend a little bit more, and get the 10′ loop-length North American Rescue Hasty Harness, which comes in at about $25, and gives you more length but will also fold up larger than the climbing sling.

To make this setup even more useful and easily carried, it can also be staged on the belt using a PHLster Flatpack to contain the sling and quickdraw. One end of the ‘draw can be attached to the sling, and the other to the ring on a riggers belt, while worn, to create a ready platform for rapid extraction.

How to best use it? The best option with any medical, or med-adjacent, skills is to get hands on training. If you can’t yet, look online for various references on casualty drags and carries, and work from there. Take some time and figure that out for yourself and your tribe, team, etc. There are multiple ways to route the sling, or attach it to equipment, and to use it to drag someone. Remember when we said that the first and best thing was to get and maintain skills at moving a casualty? Setting up and figuring out this Pocket Casualty Drag is a great opportunity to work on that.

(This article contains Amazon Affiliate links. We are a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for us to earn fees by linking to Amazon.com and affiliated sites.)